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abstract

37 - AGE, MENOPAUSAL STATUS AND THE BLADDER MICROBIOME

037

AGE, MENOPAUSAL STATUS AND THEBLADDER MICROBIOME

N. L. CURTISS1, A.BALACHANDRAN 1, L. KRSKA 2, S. WILDMAN 2,J. DUCKETT 1;
1Medway NHS Fndn. trust,Gillingham, United Kingdom, 2Univ. of Kent, ChathamMaritime, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Several differentcentres around the world have established the presence of a bladdermicrobiome. There is evidence that the bladder microbiome isdifferent in healthy individuals compared to those with a diseaseprocess such as OAB. It is well documented that there is an increasein the prevalence of OAB with age. The microbiome is known to alterin the gut with external factors and age [1]. The vaginal microbiomealso alters with age and estrogenisation [2]. It stands to reasonthat the bladder likewise will alter with age and menopausal status.A small study suggested the microbiome appears to alter with agearound a core [3].
Objective: This study was designed totest the hypothesis that the bladder microbiome of women changes inrelation to age and menopausal status
Methods: A cleancatch mid-stream urine was taken from 79 healthy women attending agynaecology clinic and female staff who did not score on the ICIQshort form. Women using hormonal medication were excluded. The urinewas centrifuged and plated in aerobic (48 hours) and anaerobic (7days) conditions. Each morphologically different colony was purityplated. The colonies were lysed and PCR undertaken to amplify aregion of the 16s rRNA gene. This DNA was sequenced to identifybacterial genera. The women were divided by menopausal status anddifferences in the microbiome were analysed by Fisher’s Exact test.Microbiomes were also analysed by age. Ethics approval was granted.There was insufficient prior data on this subject to allow a formalpower calculation to be performed.
Results: The urine from79 women was analysed. 13 women were excluded as they were takingexogenous hormones. The diversity of the bladder microbiome wasinvestigated by plotting age by number of genera identified (fig 1).There was no correlation between the age of a woman and the number ofdifferent genera identified (statistical analysis using PearsonCorrelation Coefficient r= -0.034 p=0.79).


In total 60 different genera wereidentified. The genera identified were different in the bladder ofpremenopausal women and postmenopausal women with some generaidentified in the bladders of women of all menopausal statuses (fig2). Most differences did not reach statistical significance; however,Lactobacillus was significantly more common in pre-menopausal womenthan post-menopausal women (31 pre-menopausal vs 3 post-menopausal p=0.002) and Mobiluncus which was more common in postmenopausal women(3 post-menopausal vs 0 pre-menopausal p=0.02).


Conclusions: Lactobacilluswas significantly more commonly present in the bladder microbiome ofpre-menopausal women (p= 0.003) and Mobiluncus was more common inpost-menopausal women (p=0.02). In common with smaller studies wefound no correlation between age and diversity as measured by numberof genera identified [3]. There were differences in the generaidentified in the bladder of pre-menopausal women and post-menopausalwomen with some common to both.
References: 1. Nutritionand Healthy Aging. 2016;4(1):3-16. 2. Menopause (New York, NY).2014;21(5):450-458. 3. Frontiers in Cellular and InfectionMicrobiology. 2013;3:41